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The Most Bang for the Buck? Part 1 — 6 Comments

  1. We have a 62 acre property in Ash Fork AZ. It has a fairly dry climate and decent year round weather. We have 6 kids 7-20 years in age. Our plan is to put up a small village of emergency style dome shelters that each cost less than $1000 (In Yavapai county, yo can build an earth structure that costs less than $1000 without building permits). We would design with a lot of outdoor living in mind.

    When we had only four kids, we lived for an extended period of time in a 400 sq ft space in a rainy climate. We have also lived in remote back to the lander situations, so we feel ready for the challenge. as for our property, we imagine creating an outdoor living space, courtyard style, with 5-6 small (10-12′) sleeping pods and then a 26′ diameter tipi for some additional indoor space.

    If you can think briefly about our general idea and game plan and potentially make any recommendations for plans (free or paid) that we can purchase from you, books that you think would be helpful, etc., tat would be wonderful. Also, do you recommend getting our sandbags from cal-Earth?

    I didn’t know about your site until today, so I will dig deeper to see if any of the information I am asking is hidden in one of your info gems. Thank you for your time and energy! We are in the planning stages now ad hope to leave June 1st for a road trip to our property. Once concern for our timing is the monsoon season. any thoughts?

    From my heart to yours Joy

  2. Pingback:Three Roundhouses Design « Earthbag House Plans

  3. Roofing Materials for round homes?
    So I am wondering what you suggest for roofing in areas where thatch isn’t an option. I like metal roofs especially for rainwater catchment, and abhor asphalt, but I don’t know how I would merge a steel roof to any of the cool circular designs you have. As you pointed out it tends to come in square pieces :)
    Thanks for any input.
    Richard

    • Options include wood shakes, metal shingles and living roof. We considered buying local wood shakes, but the price was a little steep and would have put us over the $10/sq. ft. goal. You can buy metal shingles or make your own from scrap. Some have used salvaged aluminum printing plates. Tire shingles are another possibility.

      Living roofs are best in rainy climates or else you’ll have too many maintenance problems. This is one of my favorites using a reciprocal pole roof: http://small-scale.net/yearofmud/

  4. Another reason why rectilinear shapes have become more dominant is that if space is confined, such as in an urban location, square shapes natural nest together to either create additional rooms or adjacent buildings.

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