Comments

Polyculture and Agroforestry — 7 Comments

  1. I wonder how many of those farmers surveyed in East Africa in the CGIAR report quoted in this post were taught to plant trees, and/or supplied seeds by the Eden Foundation?

    http://www.esthergarvi.org/
    http://edengardens.org/

    I don’t know that I would call what they are doing polyculturing, but it is indeed a massive step in that direction. At least there is not a growing trend of not cutting down their trees to keep birds from eating their millet crops (as they were taught by western colonial agriculture “experts” a few decades ago), and are planting trees instead.

    • The typing TYPO phantom strikes again. (That’s me.)

      It should read “I don’t know that I would call”

      and it also should read “At least there is now a growing trend”

      Go ahead, make your jokes and have your fun at my expense everyone.
      I deswerve it.
      I mean I desurve it.
      Uhhh. I deeserve it.
      well… something like that anyway.

  2. part of the reason we love the concept of the forest garden is because once established they are low maintenance. just want to let your readers know that they don’t need acres to start they can start small and slowly build it big.

    • Yes, that’s a big plus. Gardening takes a lot of time and effort, so we think it’s worth some extra work up front to reduce long term maintenance. Plus, we want to maximize the space we have.

  3. The photo shows what we hope our forest garden will look like in a few years. Our garden is really growing fast. Things have grown 12”-18” since we did the videos about two weeks ago. http://www.youtube.com/user/naturalhomesteader We’ve had some nice steady rains since then. Give plants adequate rain, warm weather and plenty of nutrients and they’ll grow like crazy. Who would have known?

    Follow the links and read about the various types of forest gardens. There are a lot of possibilities.

    I think the reason forest gardens are so productive is because they closely mimic nature. Forest gardens are the total opposite of large scale industrial agriculture that’s ruining our food, soil and health.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

HTML tags allowed in your comment: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <s> <strike> <strong>